Design Inspiration

Caesarstone Arctic Benches by Cellini

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

The Arctic Benches were born from the collaboration of Caesarstone and Cellini Design Center, a market leader in modern and contemporary furniture in Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia.

The simplicity of this futuristic, angular design reflects the minimalistic beauty that Cellini is known for, while exhibiting the exceptional quality, functionality and creativity of Caesarstone.

All of these benches, starting with the name 'Arctic' - from the ancient Greek ἀδάμας – adámas "unbreakable" - evokes a sense of solidity and grandeur.

Born with the intention of being the link between internal and external, domestic and wild, natural and artificial environment, the Arctic Benches have been designed and manufactured by Cellini with the latest and most sophisticated Caearstone’s Calacatta Nuvo and Vanilla Noir.

Calacatta Nuvo is an interpretation of natural Calacatta marble and it represents a real masterpiece of beauty with his wide, elegant, cascading, grey veins on a light grey base. Vanilla Noir dramatically merges solid black, bold beige and vanilla veins and enriches any interior with a unique, luxurious fell.

This two pieces together exemplify a strong, graphic approach to design. Cellini strategically chose a black and white combination, on this year hottest Caesarstone’s designs, for a bold statement. This enduring benches, together or separated, is intended to anchor a room and be the focal point for the eye.

The cool and strong surface of the benches with his fine facets and slight sheen simply give them an organic aesthetic that is at once futuristic and nature-inspired. The strength of quartz and the perfect use of symmetry donate to the benches a powerful, masculine presence that is perfect for minimalist contemporary homes and offices.

Even though the Arctic Benches are also sculptures - and normally people assume they should not sit on art – Cellini has created the work to include people, to allow them to share the same space as the art.

In any environment this art piece will represents a privileged vector of communication and socialization.